Simplifying Aspects Of Your Life – 25 Simplicity Quotes

By: Zy Marquier
January 2, 2016

Below are several quotes from respected individuals which allude to the importance of simplicity.

The reason for these is to contemplate them deeply and ruminate about what prompted them to make such statements. This should gives us an insight, no matter how limited, into the thinking/understanding that these individuals displayed in their daily lives:

“Simplicity is the ultimate form of sophistication.”
– Leonardo Da Vinci

“If you can’t explain it simple enough, you can’t understand it well enough.”
– Albert Einstein

“Beauty of style and harmony and grace and good rhythm depend on simplicity”
– Plato

“Simplicity is the keynote of all true elegance.”
– Coco Chanel

“Life is really simple, but we insist on making it complicated.”
– Confucius

“In character, in manner, in style, in all things, the supreme excellence is simplicity.”
– Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

“Be as simple as you can be; you will be astonished to see how uncomplicated and happy your life can become.”
– Paramahansa Yoganda

– Simplicity will stand out, while complexity will get lost in the crowd.”
– Kevin Barnett

“The ability to simplify means to eliminate the unnecessary so that the necessary may speak.”
– Hans Hoffman

“The greatest ideas are the simplest.”
– William Golding

– “If you can’t explain it to a six year old, you don’t understand it yourself.”
– Albert Einstein

“It is not a daily increase, but a daily decrease. Hack away at the inessentials.”
– Bruce Lee

“Truth is ever to be found in the simplicity and not in the multiplicity and confusion of things.”
– Isaac Newton

“Nothing is more simple than greatness; indeed, to be simple is to be great.”
– Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Very often, people confuse simple with simplistic. The nuance is lost on most.”
– Clement Monk

“How many undervalue the power of simplicity! But it is the real key to the heart.”
– William Wordsworth

“Today’s complexities demand greater simplicity.”
– Elder L. Tom Perry

“Live simply so that others may simply live.”
– Mother Theresa

“Any intelligent fool can make things bigger and more complex…it takes a touch of genius – and a lot of courage to move in the opposite direction.”
– Albert Einstein

“Embrace simplicity…Be content with what you have and are, and not one can despoil you.”
– Chris Prentiss

Every day we have plenty of opportunities to get angry, stressed or offended. But what you’re doing when you indulge these negative emotions is giving something outside yourself power over your happiness. You can choose to not let little things upset you.
– Joel Osteen

“Simplicity, patience, compassion. These three are your greatest treasures.”
– Laozi

“Simplicity is the glory of expression.”
– Walt Whitman

“Simplicity is the nature of great souls.”
– Papa Ramadas

“Simplicity is realizing what you need rather than what you want.”
– Apoorve Dubey

In our current day an age, there is an excess of complexity which plagues the populace. We have all dealt with many issues which harbor extreme complexity to the hilt. Much of it is out of our hands; not all however.

If the complexity is overdone, this leads to all manner of detrimental circumstances which are harmful to the individual, waste their time, and increase their stress.

As is often the case, for many issues there are solutions that can be viewed far easier if one just takes a step back and analyzes the situation from a detached point of view [POV]. Although not taught in conventional schooling, the mental tool of seeing things from a detached macro-POV is extremely useful for being able to see how different things interlock in the grand scheme of things rather than viewing things from a 1st person limited POV.

Allow me to repeat Paramahansa Yoganda’s incisive quote that might be of great use to most of us in the current world we live in: “Be as simple as you can be; you will be astonished to see how uncomplicated and happy your life can become.”

If ever there were a quote that precisely relates how people would be best served, this one would be one of them.

Its so simple, its elegant.   And it would solve countless problems and ameliorate stress as well.

So why not keep implement this tool into your repertoire?

Simplicity is just another choice/tool for the proactive individual.

2016 Breakaway Goals

Fantasy

“If it doesn’t challenge you, it doesn’t change you.”
– Anonymous

By: Zy Marquiez
January 1, 2016

After seeing a post from another fellow blogger [and am thankful for this person for doing it, because its prompted this very post], it occurred to me that although daily goals are a part of my life and have helped me greatly when employed, it hadn’t occurred to me to write my goals for 2016.

For myself, am of a mind that every day should be lived to the fullest extent. That might not always be possible, but if we keep that notion in the back of our mind it’s a lot easier to accomplish a lot more by gravitating towards that which drives us in life.

Some of these goals might seem simple, some of them overly complex. However, as mentioned in a previous blog called ‘What Is The Best Use Of Your Time‘, the average person spends 5 hours watching TV daily.

With the above fact in mind, it was found that:

“In an entire 168 hour work-week where the average person spends, 56 hours a week sleeping, and 40 hours a week working, that leaves one with 72 hours free. If one were to spend 35 hours a week viewing television, then that would leave 37 hours of free time. That’s nearly half of all of one’s available time spent watching television. That seems ludicrous, does it not?”

That’s a lot of free time that could be used doing something else besides watching tv.

On the flip side of that, my niche is reading. Reading, reading, reading and more reading. Reading things of many genres and about countless topics. Sprinkle some writing around that and still we got some reading. This is how assimilating so much information becomes simpler.

The other thing is that, at the back end of my life, the thought of having spent so much time doing something that brings almost nothing of real value would mean a life half wasted so to speak. That’s just not acceptable. We’re here to kick ass, take names, and blow the lids off the box of mediocrity. Anything else would just be selling my-self short.

In any case, here are the goals:

– Continue fostering the great relationships that have helped me grow as an individual.
– Meet new people, and learn as much as possible not only from them, but from the paths that they have chosen to walk, regardless of their reason.
– Be even more inquisitive than in the past
–  Follow my instincts all of the time, no matter how big or small the issue might be.
– Read 100 books, or 20,000 pages within books. Whatever comes first between those two. [This does not count pages read by articles/papers researched].  As an inquiring mind, am always looking for more ways to learn more so…
– A side goal to above is that 10 of the 100 books need to be philosophy books.
– Read 1500 articles health, science, finance, history, etc.
– Write at least 50 book reviews for the blog.  This is to help give back to others.
– Write 50 poems of any type. This one is mainly to keep promoting my personal creativity.
– Paint 50 paintings. This one am new at [and am incredibly thankful for Jon Rappoport for mentioning it quite often], but it’s still something that like writing and poetry, helps vault imagination forward. So onward we will go.
– Workout for minimum 30 minutes a day at least 5 times a week. Health is a very important aspect of my life, and slacking here would be highly detrimental.
– Take my time before carrying out all decisions in my life. This will be the most complex, but it will yield the greatest results.  It is also a very general goal, but it actually will couple to every part of my life.
– Lastly, continue to add content to the blog and grow the blog up to at least 500 regular readers.  Its been great being able to interact and see how much variety there is to be had within the interwebz blogosphere realm, so am looking forward to more.

Most of these goals revolve around helping others as others have helped me, as well as pushing myself beyond my current state of mind/health/life.

Its all about wanting more – doing more.

It’s about breaking away.

And since everything great at its most nascent stage begins with a choice, these are my choices.

What are your choices/goals for 2016?

Would love to hear them.

Good luck in 2016 and Happy New Years to you all.

————————————————————-
Sources:

http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/average-american-watches-5-hours-tv-day-article-1.1711954
https://thebreakaway.wordpress.com/2015/11/17/what-is-the-best-use-of-your-time/
https://thebreakaway.wordpress.com/2015/12/22/what-does-it-mean-to-breakaway/

Book Review: Secret Missions 2: The Lost Expeditions Of Sir Francis Burton by Walter Bosley

secretmissions2

TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
December 31, 2015

In his second book in the ‘Secret Mission’ series, Walter Bosley takes us on an adventure that’s quite breathtaking as it is thought provoking.

Secret Missions 2: The Lost Expeditions Of Sir Francis Burton is a strong sequel to the first book Secret Missions: The Hidden Legacy Of Old California, which was just as dynamite as this one.

Bosley begins by building the background for the case that Burton – as an agent of multiple institutions – carries out a classic ‘op within an op’ that covert circles are littered with.

From locale to locale facts are explored & synthesized, thence extrapolated from rather incisively in a way that makes the reader follow the case he is making for Burton’s hunt for an ancient civilization[s?].

Burton’s extensive work is used to build the case, and many of the finer theories are inferred quite logically given the availability, and sometimes lack thereof of information. Not because the author doesn’t search, but because some of the vital data is downright classified still to this day. That begs the question: why?

What was so imperative, that long after Burton is gone, long after the world has changed over countless times, that information found in an expedition – that according to mainstream biographers didn’t take place – that took six months and countless locales still hasn’t made the light of day?

The answer to the question, and more, is the quest of Bosley.

At certain junctures, this book even dovetails slightly with his previous Secret Missions book, which goes to show how much interest the ruling powers of the day had in the civilizations of ‘high antiquity’. This is easy to see once we see the breadth and scope of the technological capabilities [megaliths, etc.], history and knowledge that could be had from the search and seizure of ancient loot, knowledge, et al.

Knowledge that could arguably set the foundation for something much more, advanced.

In any case, if you’re used to Bosley’s previous work, or fascinated in these particular subjects, this book will be a quick read for you.

The strength of this book lies in the amount of data provided by the author, which only serves to buttress his argument that much more.

Its one of those book that truly makes you wonder about how much history has been kept from us.

And better yet, what still remains out there unexplored…

Given how much of or history has been distorted, suppressed, and erased, and coupled with Bosley’s knack for the period, have a feeling myself that this and his previous book are ‘only the beginning’ of many more grounded, logical, and insightful adventures.