Book Review: The Ascension Mysteries by David Wilcock

theascensionmysteries
BreakawayConsciousness
Zy Marquiez
December 7, 2016

The Ascension Mysteries by David Wilcock is an interesting dissertation into the possibilities that the Universe may yield in the future.  Wilcock’s foray into the fiercely phenomenal is an unbounded approach into what he believes wholeheartedly to be taking place in the world at this time.

The book features a collation of data points, some of which come from verifiable sources, and some of which come from alleged whistleblowers, that merges in its core into what Wilcock has repeatedly called the ascension process.

Incidentally, the first half of the book felt more like having a salad, and the second part of the book was where the meat and potatoes was at.   As a connoisseur of data, the second part was far more interesting than the first, and am definitely highly appreciative of the countless sources Wilcock uses where applicable.

As a forewarning, some chapter titles – mostly particularly in the first half of the book – are a bit of a misnomer because they make the chapters seem like they were going to be vastly more interesting than they actually were.  This is coming from someone who knows how interesting Wilcock’s work has been in the past.  The subject matters within the first half of the book often went in personal directions, which in a sense was a bit of a letdown considering the possibilities the chapter’s name featured.  That’s a subjective point of view, so your mileage may vary.

In the nascent stage of The Ascension Mysteries, the author begins questioning much of what we’ve been taught in public schooling, which quite admittedly not only paints history in a different light, but is downright obscure when one delves deeply into that matter.

In any case, Wilcock proceeds to lay the foundation for his work with an analysis of the structure of the Universe, which he has termed “The Source Field”.  He uses references such as the work of Dr. Hans Jenny and Dr. Luc Montagnier to buttress this theory.

The author follows up touching lightly upon Disclosure Project which took place in 2001 and featured reputable people that claim to have access to data considering UFOs and cover ups that would boggle the mind and these individuals were also willing to testify before congress.

Thereafter, saliently noted by the author are the myriad issues we as a society face with the constant bombardment of what the Cabal wishes to infuse the populace regarding Illuminati Symbolism in pop culture & media, while also venturing into his personal background into relation to how he grew to find this information.

Noted within the confines of the book are also references to Carlos Castaneda and how his findings dovetail with alternative realities.  Wilcock also notes how his dreams helped lay the foundation of much of what he knows while also how Big Pharma played a roll into the health deterioration of his mother.  The author gives mention to the many instances of personal synchronicities that took place in his life.

From there the author speaks at length about personnel events that revolve around ESP, and how that has helped manifest much of what we know of regarding his work today.  In fact, a great portion of the first half of the book is interweaved with personal anecdotes regarding the journey that he has gone through.

Noted also by the author is his delving into LSD as well as his foray into Lucid Dreaming travels spawned in large part by the work of Dr. Stephen LaBerge’s PhD Lucid Dreaming book.  With this, Wilcock gives us how those two events also played a roll into his understanding of reality as he saw it at the time and as he sees it now.

Promptly soon after, the author then touches upon NASA and many of the issues regarding the information they have covered up at the time, and some of which they still cover up today.  Mentioned with the factors of NASA’s duplicitious dealings are whistleblower testimony from personnel who were privy to information about Moon missions and such, which definitely leave the reader knowing something is amyss within the halls of NASA.

Covering the work of Maurice Chatelain, who was the director of communications for the Apollo missions, Wilcock also shows how his findings of the “Constant of Nineveh” couple into the book.   Wilcock also covers how the Constant of Nineveh interweaves into the Solar system, how precession helps bring ascension about, and how ancient history is littered with references to a possible ascension according to his understanding.

Curiously, Wilcock makes mention of the Breakaway Civilization, but he never mentions that it was Richard Dolan who coined the term in his magnum opus series UFOs & The National Security State.  Given how much Wilcock talks about Secret Space Programs, you would figure he would give a proper nod to the idea’s creator, since it couples perfectly with Secret Space Program, especially since he’s one of the most credible in UFOlogy.

Be that as it may, Wilcock then sets his cross hairs on NASA by giving it a much more in-depth look later in the book that covers a much more thorough approach than earlier on.

Other notable topics include stargates, Ancient Civilizations, moon bases, moon anomalies across the solar system, unofficial disclosure, underground bases, insider testimony, the fight against the cabal, and much more.

One of the strongest strengths of the book is also its greatest weakness some will argue, and that is his heavy reliability on insider testimony.  Knowing this, it’s definitely an area to keep note of.  Some aspects of the book are much stronger than others, but the totality of data points sets the stage for possibilities in intricate ways.

Secondly, the main ‘con’ of the book – as mentioned previously – is that a lot of the first half of the book is filled with personal info that could have been summarized a lot more efficiently and not so verbose, thus allowing for the book to have even more tangible information.  While the information Wilcock provides regarding his family and his past is important to understand all the early process in relation to Wilcock’s background, he could have just stacked more evidence for himself instead.

Ironically, a great part of the book felt like reading a journal.  That’s okay, since it’s part of Wilcock’s approach but given the topic at hand it would have been nice for his book to be structured in a way that was as ironclad as possible rather than overly anecdotal in a few areas.  That’s just an opinion though.  Given that Wilcock features many references where applicable, some would argue that he’s already given us ample evidence for his many arguments.

Whether or not people agree with Wilcock’s thesis of ascension is up to them.  With all the evidence he provides where applicable, it at least gives people something to ponder about regarding the many topics covered and their inherent implications.

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BreakawayConsciousness

Zy Marquiez is an avid book reviewer, an open-minded skeptic, yogi, and freelance writer who regularly studies subjects such as: Consciousness, Education, Creativity, The Individual, Ancient History & Ancient Civilizations, Forbidden Archaeology, Big Pharma, Alternative Health, Space, Geoengineering, Social Engineering, Propaganda, and much more. His own personal blog is BreakawayConsciousnessBlog.wordpress.com where his personal work is shared, while TheBreakaway.wordpress.com serves as a media portal which mirrors vital information usually ignored by mainstream press, but still highly crucial to our individual understanding of various facets of the world. My work can also be found on https://steemit.com/@zyphrex.

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