Book Review: Healing Chi Meditation by Sifu William Lee

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TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
January 29, 2017

Healing Chi Meditation by Sifu William Lee is a rather straight forward, and yet methodical book that covers the subject of meditation from a no-nonsense point of view.

Lee does a compelling job in laying out an easy-to-follow guide covering the main components of meditation.

This book covers just enough information to help people get an essential crash course into meditation, but it doesn’t become overly complex like some other books.  It’s strength definitely lies in its simplicity in learning and application.

Covered within the book are the foundational stages of meditation, the how’s and why’s of why to do meditation and how to prepare to net the greatest benefits.  And yet, the strongest part comes at the latter stages of the book.

Lee covers what is known as Dan Tian Centering as well as the 8 Moons.  And he anchors all of this with a template for the Little Universe Micro Cycle.

This is my first book from Lee, and have two others, one of which am currently reading and am definitely glad to have gotten these.  The other book is just as pragmatic as this one, and am enjoying it just as much and even netting benefits from it.

Simply put, if you’re interested in meditation and don’t know where to begin, get this book.

Book Review: Quantum Healing – Exploring The Frontiers Of Mind-Body Medicine by Deepak Chopra, M.D.

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BreakawayConsciousness
Zy Marquiez
December 12, 2016

Quantum Healing – Exploring The Frontiers Of Mind-Body Medicine by Deepak Chopra, M.D. is fascinating foray into the fusion of the mind and the body in respect to the healing possibilities to be had.

Chopra sifts through some studies, as well as uses examples known to him to showcase that the power of the mind is vital in healing.  In fact, in some cases it could be said to be the main driver in someone’s ability to heal.

Although this particular book was published over two decades ago, the information still holds as true now as it did back then.  Serendipitously, more and more studies have come about showing the inherent link between the mind and body and how that can play a crucial role in the art of healing.

Unfortunately, the opposite is also true.  While the author doesn’t discuss this, it has been discussed elsewhere however.  Individuals that allow their thoughts to err into more detrimental  states can set themselves up for failure at the outset.  Or sometimes, doctors will tell people that “they can’t be cured” as happens to so many, and people run with those beliefs [and they are beliefs, because this has been proven wrong a lot more than people realize, and am a living example of this myself] all the way beyond the cliff’s edge.  But don’t take my word for it.  Do your own research.

One of my favorite parts of the book, although not explored at length, was delving into the power of meditation.  As some of you may know, meditation has outstanding healing powers, and it has helped me in conquering disease.  It wasn’t used by itself however, but it was an integral component in my healing repertoire and will always will be part of my life.  Let’s digress, though.

In its totality, the book was good, but not great.  If you’ve researched this subject the book won’t have a lot that you probably won’t know, or have already come to the conclusion too yourself.  If you haven’t however, this book features information that should be pondered deeply by society, for its implications spawn at warp speed and its ramifications are deep in scope.

As a side note, a new revised and updated version is available.  Although haven’t read it myself, it might be a decent jump-off point for individuals seeking additional information.

Regardless, please keep in mind, the thoughts we ultimately fill our minds with ultimately may grow into healing, or disease if we are not careful.

Book Review: Perfect Breathing by Al Lee & Don Campbell

perfectbreathing
BreakawayConsciousness
Zy Marquiez
July 16, 2016

Perfect Breathing by Al Lee & Don Campbell is an indispensible resource for individuals seeking to learn the intricacies of what the ‘perfect breath’ entails.

For me, the notion of ‘perfect breathing’ was rather intriguing at first blush for a variety of reasons.  The deeper one delves within the pages of this book, the easier it was to see the various ways individuals can end up carrying out imperfect breathing.

As the authors note:

“During times of stress – and that can be anything from lack of sleep, screaming kids, or a bad day at work to physical confrontations, overwork, or being chased by lions – we become shallow chest breathers.  Chest breathing stimulates the sympathetic nervous system’s fight-or-flight response, a response we’ll speak of often.  It makes the body react as if it’s in a state of emergency and produces a buildup of stress-related chemicals such as adrenaline and lactic acid.  Researchers have found that prolonged shallow, rapid breathing – while necessary to protect us from immediate danger – can make us feel chronically anxious, fatigued, or disoriented.  Shallow breathing also contributes to stress-related and stress-affected disorders such as PMS, menstrual cramps, headaches, migraines, insomnia, high blood pressure, asthma, back pain, and allergies.”[1]

That passage resonated with me quite profoundly, because before knowing that, because of stress and a particular disease shallow breathing plagued me quite often.  Something else that bothered me often as well was holding my breath unknowingly in times of stress.

Fortuitously, the book also provides a kaleidoscope of breathing exercises that can help an individual breathe optimally.

Another small gem of information that’s shared by the authors regards one of the exercises suggested.  The authors suggest [what we’ll call the 2-1-2-1 breathing technique] inhaling for two seconds, holding breath for one second, exhaling for 2 seconds, and holding for one second, and repeating as needed.  This technique has been used by me for years now, while alternating with another one.

This was used in tandem with a modified  4-4-4-4 system, based on the suggestion of Lt. Col. Dave Grossman, in his book On Combat.  Both breathing techniques help me greatly, except the later one helps me slow down not only my breath, but also helps slow down my mind a lot more which aids me personally in a variety of circumstances.  The instances will dictate what feels right at the time for me.

In any case, as the authors note about the 2-1-2-1 breathing technique:

“This exercise, as simple and innocuous as it seems, is the most important exercise to master.  Once you have developed the habit of slow, deep breathing and your body remembers that this is the natural way to breathe, it will slowly become a part of everything that you do.  It will become your “secret weapon” when you need an extra burst of energy; it will become your rock when you are feeling emotional shattered; and it will become a peaceful, quiet refuge at times when you need sanctuary.”[2]

As someone who’s used this technique and others more and more over time several times daily, the benefits have been quite great for myself as well as those friends of mine who also chose to use it.

The authors also showcase easily a few dozen references to studies conducted in respect to breathing, stress, and various other physiological issues.

In its totality, this book is a masterpiece in the art of breathing, and it should be highly considered by everyone, particularly those experiencing stress regularly, or disease.  Either way, the book has enough information for any individual to take advantage of this book.  And the best part about it is that its advice is free, and easy to follow.

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Sources:

[1] Al Lee & Don Campbell, Perfect Breathing, pg. 12-13.
[2] Ibid., pg. 53.

Book Review: Meditation For Warriors – Practical Mediation For Cops, Soldiers & Martial Artists – Loren W. Christensen

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BreakawayConsciousness
Zy Marquiez
June 20, 2016

In Western Culture, the subject of Meditation conjures all types of varying pictures.

In Easter Culture, the value of Meditation has been known for thousands of years, and it’s become a staple of many a discipline, and with good reason.

Meditation is something that is many things for many individuals.  For our purposes here, meditation is seen as a tool, for starters, although it is much, much more.

In Meditation For Warriors- Practical Mediation For Cops, Soldiers & Martial Artists – By Loren W. Christensen, the author showcases how simple meditation and all of its intricacies can be carried out when applied.

Though Christensen acknowledges that meditation can be quite complex – if the individual so chooses – the author chooses to make things much easier to follow when he shows us not only why meditation is useful, but also why it’s needed.

The book also features extensive anecdotes from numerous individuals and what each has garnered from this tool.

Not only does Christensen give us countless tips to hone our meditation skills, but he also gives us a step by step process of how to follow each example he enumerates.

From delving lightly into how important the subconscious mind is, to also tackling the importance of breath control, the author takes a rather in-depth approach into many of the abstruse areas of meditation.  The issue of negative thinking is also given a cursory glance, while the author also harpoons various methods of meditation available and the many intricacies of those therein.

All in all, the book is really useful for anyone wishing to explore the subject of meditation if they are not familiar with the subject.  It’s methodical, easy-to follow and simple approach makes an abstruse subject such as meditation rather easy to learn about.

Meditation is a tool that is as great and powerful as its precision of use.  This book helps the individual employ this tool and its effect will be proportional to the drive the individual employs in its application.