Book Review: Empire Of The Wheel [Part 1] – An Investigation Of Occult Espionage & Murder By Walter Bosley & Richard B. Spence

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BreakawayConsciousness
Zy Marquiez
January 7, 2016

In Empire Of The Wheel – An Occult Investigation Of Occult Espionage And Murder Walter Bosley & Richard Spence take us on a fascinating, and yet disturbing examination of the occult happenings of 20th Century Southern California.

From the get go the authors begin to paint the picture of what the environment was like, and what was taking place when each of the unfortunate victims were slain.

A very detailed and extensive inspection is done of the facts, as well as various theories that might shed light into what possibly took place during those murky times. The word might is used because it’s up to the reader to decide whether or not these murders [that’s what my gut says] were ‘random’, or if they had a more deeper meaning – an esoteric one perhaps.

The authors caution against expecting answers outright, as definitive answers are one of the things that are hard to pinpoint with such an abstruse case that has facts missing and is about a century old.

The book is part “Unsolved Mysteries” and part “X-Files” [of the esoteric type]. Sprinkle in the author’s unique perspectives and they elucidate a picture – a rather astounding one at that – that is being painted of such astonishing magnitude that it would shock the average mind.

As mentioned in the book, this mystery is nigh forgotten [if not outright unknown] by most. It is quite sad, because the events that took place 100 years ago seem to have a devious connection to the latest San Bernardino event that took place in 2015, yes, 100 years ago to the date that it all took place. Coincidence?

This investigation of this [esoteric] criminal casts its web across many different characters, and is absolutely so chock-full of coincidences synchronicities that its mind boggling. Seriously. That’s not an overstatement. There are so many by the end of the book that to argue against some sort of coordination would stretch the incisive mind.

From ritual sacrifice, to , and even British & German spies coupled with an examination of the sinking of the Lusitania that might dovetail with the book’s main premise, this book has as much range as it has scope. And still, it has more.

The authors even anchor part of their analysis with an assessment of the Zodiac Killer and his machinations. Keeping in mind that the Zodiac Killer was never caught, it was disturbingly eerie how poignant the correlations were between what took place in 1915, and what took place 1968.

All in all, this book paints a much murkier picture of this segment of history than people would ever imagine. Still, it’s a much needed point of view that is needed in order to not only understand what did take place a long time ago, but for what has taken place again since then and is taking place still now.

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Book Review: – Secret Missions, The Hidden Legacy Of Old California

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BreakawayConsciousness
Zy Marquiez
December 22, 2015

Secret Missions, The Hidden Legacy of Old California is a non-stop examination of an operation that culminates in California.

However, the book has to do with a larger geographical adventure than merely one state. In that way the title does the book a disservice.

From the title alone, one would never in a million years guess how engaging, how informative and how mind-bendingly fascinating this sojourn into hidden history is.

This fine-toothed-comb examination of data has a breadth of various regions in different continents, all connected via what some would call the World Grid, and a scope of rather profound of elements [literally] that only serve to buttress Bosley’s theory.

The examination of the Telluric currents is but one piece in a larger stratosphere, and Walter Bosley does a trenchant job of examining all the components that lead the reader through an adventure for a stunning – and yet well known – artifact that’s traveled through various secretive hands throughout time. Hands that have long sought any advanced knowledge/technology that civilizations from high antiquity might have ‘left behind’ so to speak.

Bosley weaves his thesis masterfully, as he begins by deconstructing the official narrative of Christopher Columbus and the New World, and how that itself couples with a multitude of other ideas/cultures the like of which most wouldn’t ever even consider to sift through.

In Bosley’s quest, some connections are more direct than others, but they all serve to form a bastion under his thesis. Bosley does a rather acute job of showing how many abstruse locales/events/people connect with one another and how those ultimately lead not only to a powerful and yet ‘mystical’ treasure in away, but how this artifact was protected via the actions of a select few throughout time.

Would say much more than that, but that would be doing a great disservice to Bosley’s work. If you’re interested in alternative history, how parts of our history have been obfuscated from us, how some of those events dovetail with hidden treasures, and how a covert select few – a hidden order – have moved and maintained a certain treasure, then this is the book for you.