Book Review: Lifting The Veil by Jon Rappoport

lifting-the-veil
TheBreakaway
Zy Marquiez
February 5, 2016

In this very unique book, Lifting The Veil – David Icke Interviewed by Jon Rappoport, the author undertakes the interesting task interviewing as the book says the “most controversial speaker in the world”. Talk about an understatement.

There are many interesting topics covered by Rappoport and his interviewee, much [most?] of which is still relevant today.

The most notable topic discussed includes the fascinating subject of ‘The Brotherhood’, which is the name of group which some people might call The Illuminati, The Powers that [Shouldn’t Be], so on and so forth. Throughout the length of the book most of the subjects dovetail with this main shadow group and for good reason.

As many researchers have shown, there is an active thread of corruption that has been taking place for quite some time. What we call this conspiracy of corruption, power, greed and manipulation is irrelevant, for those very elements have been with humanity for centuries, if not longer.

In Icke’s point of view, the conspiracy goes back much farther than centuries. Again, although he might be right, it matters not for the most part. Reason being is that as long as it remains active today, that’s all that matters. That’s one of the things this book explores, and in a fascinating way at that.

Other notable topics include Icke’s point of view of the elite waging war, the creative power of the individual, how consciousness dovetails into all of this, as well as the notorious corruption with the Bushes and some of their nefarious dealings.

Icke and Rappaport even give a cursory look at the death of Princess Diana, while giving a more notable glance at the subject of mind control, MK Ultra, and so on.

From the get-go, Rappoport makes it a point of letting the reader know he doesn’t agree with everything Icke says. In truth, it’s not about agreeing, but more so about being open about the information knowing that there is a lot people don’t know about, and those abstruse topics are certainly explored quite in depth.

All in all, the book/interview sheds a kaleidoscope of information onto subjects that rarely if ever get covered by the mainstream. And when they do, it’s in essence as gatekeepers for the establishment.

If you are interested in finding out who’s running the show, at least from Icke’s point of view, then this book will definitely shed some light onto that.