Book Review: The Healing Power Of Touch – The Many Ways Physical Contact Can Cure by Karin Sullivan

healingpoweroftouch

BreakawayConsciousness
Zy Marquiez
December 12, 2016

The Healing Power Of Touch – The Many Ways Physical Contact Can Cure by Karin Sullivan is an encyclopedia – albeit a small one – outlining the various ways that healing can be brought about through touch.

Sullivan begins by examining data which shows how powerful human touch can be.

From there the book is essentially split into two parts.

The first part of the book examines the vast array of touch therapies available to individuals.  Granted, given the wide-array of therapies discussed, the author gives each therapy a very cursory but reasonable overview.  Within these therapies discussed, some of the ones mentioned are: acupressure, reflexology, reiki, shiatsu, chiropractic, ayurvedic massage, aromatherapy massage, applied kinesiology, myofascial release, and much more.

From there on, the second part of the book focuses on specific conditions.  These conditions, which number at least 50 in the book, include many major diseases.  Each of these lists various of the therapies which were known at the time to work.  Some of these conditions included diabetes, depression, insomnia, headaches, hypertension, colitis, cancer, burns, bronchitis, bone spurs, sinusitis, shoulder pain, sciatica, pregnancy discomfort, Parkinson’s disease, nausea and vomiting, cancer, asthma, arthritis, and more.

One thing to keep in mind is that the information provided within the book was published in 1998.  Since then there has been increasing evidence and studies that showcase the many benefits of many of the alternative therapies mentioned in the book.  How many studies have been conducted really depends on which therapy is covered, but the fact remains that the benefits have helped many.

Alternative therapies have been growing immensely over the years and it is now a multibillion dollar industry.  This goes to show people are attempting to get away, and rightly so, from regular for-every-ill-there-is-a-pill mindset of BigPharma.  Books like this one help show what’s available for individuals, even if the book is slightly dated.

Regardless, the book can serve as a small encyclopedia, or as a jump-off point from where the individual may research further any of these topics.  Given that there are no side-effects for these therapies, they should at minimum be considered, if not downright researched thoroughly for individuals who have disease, or wish to stay in a health state of being.