Dr. Kelly Brogan – Depression: Busting Myths & Finding Answers

TheBreakaway
Vid Source: SacredScienceDoc
Zy Marquiez
April 3, 2017

Dr. Kelly Brogan’s book, A Mind Of Your Own – The Truth About Depression, was one of the top 3 Books of the Year for 2016 at The Breakaway. The depth and scope of the information presented within that book was not unlike what Dr. Peter Breggin did in his quintessential Toxic Psychiatry.

Interviewed below, Dr. Brogan goes into many of the pervasive myths taking place within the field while offering her insights on issues within psychiatry.
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To learn more about alternative ways of treating depression and other conditions, visit us at http://www.thesacredscience.com/.

A few months ago we had the chance to sit down with Dr. Kelly Brogan, a NYC-based psychiatrist who’s offering a new approach to healing.

Trained in the ways of Western Medicine, but having seen first hand the way the system has evolved into what it is today, under the influence of pharmaceuticals, she is shining the light on some very important truths and turning everything we know about the topic of depression on its head.

The question “is pain and suffering a good thing?” might seem like something only the Dalai Llama would ask, but in our interview, Kelly discusses how going through tough times and hardships actually make us stronger, and equip us with the tools to combat even harder struggles down the line.

If you’re interested in learning about the true meaning of depression and how to treat it the right way, or what we may be losing by the death of the rites of passage, or why all mainstream media outlets said no to sharing the information in her new book “A Mind of Your Own,” even though it was backed by one of the biggest names in publishing, you should definitely watch this interview.

The knowledge she shares will change the way you think about what you or your loved ones have gone through, or are going through now, and more importantly, how to move forward in the best way possible…

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Book Review: A Mind Of Your Own: The Truth About Depression And How Women Can Heal Their Bodies To Reclaim Their Lives by Kelly Brogan M.D and Kristin Loberg

amindofyourown
BreakAwayConsciousness
Zy Marquiez
March 18, 2016

“Psychiatric diagnosis still relies exclusively on fallible subjective judgments rather than objective biological tests.”
– Dr. Allen Frances, author of Saving Normal

“Probably as much as 75% of the medicine of sickness is unnecessary and its cost can be avoided.”
–  Dr. Ghislaine Lanctot, Author Of The Medical Mafia

Dr. Kelly Brogan’s work first became known to me when she addressed countless health issues in an article she penned years back that was shared via the website GreenMedInfo. From there, she’s been one of my ‘go-to’ alternative medical doctors whose work we attempt to read as much as possible.

Given that, we’ve come to expect high quality information from the author, and she does not disappoint.

A Mind Of Your Own: The Truth About Depression And How Women Can Heal Their Bodies To Reclaim Their Lives by Kelly Brogan M.D and Kristin Loberg, takes the reader through a journey of countless examples of issues regarding medications doled out like candy by Big Pharma and doctors, coupled with other notable concerns within the medical establishment.

As someone who’s had a few friends that have depression, as well as being a person that has great interest in health, the information presented within this book is certainly greatly appreciated.

One of the greatest strengths A Mind Of Your Own showcases is the fact that this book is  chock-full of real data that would shock most people who haven’t begin doing their own research within the health establishment. In fact, some of it can be quite downright disturbing considering how many are affected by medications, which numbers in the untold millions.

Not only is this book a rather quick read, but the reader can see/feel the honesty and concern that have been staples of Brogan throughout her work. This is vital, because in the arena of medicine, there are countless doctors who care more about prescribing pills, than they do about the welfare of the patient and actually solving the problem.  This is known personally to me and my family via my many hospitalizations due to poor health, doing exactly what the doctors claimed.  It was only when seeking my own solutions following nutrition, getting off of medications, and many other issues that true healing began for myself.

This is where Dr. Brogan shines, because is doing what should be undertaken by most, if not all doctors or concerned individuals within the medical establishment, which is outlining the dangers so many people are going through in respect to side effects by the overmedication of America, as well as offering solutions/alternatives to the for-profit medical system.

Brogan’s outlook on the mental health in America is quite unique and reminiscent of another author. In fact, for me, it reminds me of a book called Toxic Psychiatry by Peter R. Breggin M.D., where the author not only outlines problems within the psychiatric establishment, but also, like Brogan, covers issues with medications that most people would consider safe, but aren’t as safe as they are made out to be.

Am not saying that the Dr. Brogan’s work takes from Dr. Breggin. What am saying is however, that both doctors have great concern regarding mainstream health, and seem to share very similar values in how they think patients should be treated in respect to solutions and such. This is just a personal opinion however.

This particular book ventures in a myriad of paths.  It rightly gives an extensive look into the theory of depression and not only how that is flawed but an outright fallacy.  It also covers many of the ways in which depression symptoms can manifest in people, which at times are solved with merely vitamins.  Coupled with that she mentions the little known fact that it only takes two studies to acquire FDA approval.

One would expect, with tens of millions of lives at stake, and with dozens of side effects to boot per medication, a more thorough process would be in place to safeguard against possible iatrogenic circumstances that plague the populace en mass.  But such is not the case.

Another great notion Brogan centers in on within her book is done in her chapter called The Great Psychiatric Pretenders.  Within it, Brogan details not only how the one-size-fits-all type of care that is carried out in America is inefficient, but she also provides a few of the circumstances that create bedlam within individuals and are often categorized as depression, but are incorrectly diagnosed.

It’s imperative to know this because people are walking around thinking a pill is the only solution to their problems when there are many more solutions than they realize.

Brogan also sheds light in a cursory glance at the fact that serious drug fraud has taken place in the past which is unknown to many.

There aren’t many doctors out there standing up for what’s right within medicine, but both Dr. Brogan and a growing number of others are. That is why is so vital to support these people, because they’re in it to help people and refuse to throw people under the bus.

In any case, if you’ve read any of Dr. Brogans work, this will definitely follow suit. She definitely pulls no punches in her journey to not only outlining dangers individuals should be concerned about, but also in offering holistic solutions that many do not realize are available.

If you’ve made it this far, and are really interested in the topic, do yourself a favor and purchase this book. That, or perhaps recommend it to people that might find great value in it, because they will find information that’s not only deep, but quite extensive. The information in this book can really change the course of someone’s life if they realize what’s out there.

In the age of information, ignorance is no excuse, and this book does an outstanding job of erasing mountains of ignorance that otherwise would be everpresent in respect to the mainstream medical establishment if one were not to exposed to it.

Bottom line, not only does Brogan absolutely eviscerate the Depression is a “chemical imbalance” meme with truck loads of data, but she also gives the reader precise methods in which they can retake their health back.

Now, if that’s not self-empowerment, what is?

Book Review: Quiet – The Power Of Introverts In A World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain

quiet
BreakawayConsciousness
Zy Marquiez
March 29, 2016

Quiet – The Power Of Introverts In A World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain is absolute fascinating read into the inner workings of the reflective introverts that populate society.

This book by Susan Cain delves into the paradigm that has been glossed over in the “Culture Of Personality”.

Cain begins the book outlining the fact that we as a society have transitioned from a Culture Of Character to a Culture of Personality, which thus left us facing myriad issues from which society still faces today.

The book even elucidates that the world personality was not part of our vocabulary until the 18th century and that “the idea of “having a good personality” was not widespread until the twentieth.”  This goes to show that this notion is quite modern indeed.

Throughout the entirety of the book the author also enumerates countless examples of research and studies that have taken place which shows the notable differences between introverts and extroverts.  Its quite intriguing considering how wrong western culture has been about introverts over the last many decades, if not longer.

Even the school system has been tailored to fit the ‘culture of personality’ rather than the ‘culture of virtue’.  That has done a great disservice to many folks, because as the book mentions between a third to a half of all people are introverts, and yet school is not only geared to push the personality paradigm, but people that are introverts get run over by the system due to people thinking there’s something “wrong” with just wanting to do work by yourself, or perhaps in a less noisy environment that fosters greater inner growth for such individuals.

In fact, the book names a few examples where parents, or people, thought something was “wrong” with a particular individual, when that was just their nature.  Not only that, but introverts, in many facets, outdo extroverts due to their nature.  It’s not that there are inherently smarter than them, its that their process is more efficient in many ways.

Ironically enough, Cain mentions how “we perceive talkers as smarter than quiet types – even though grade-point averages and SAT intelligence scores reveal this perception to be inaccurate.”

Cain also covers the interesting topic of the “Bus to Abilene,” which shows people’s penchant for following others who carry out actions – any actions.

The author also covers the topic of The New Groupthink.

Within her thoughts, she gives her concerns for the system, which is constantly giving precedence for group work – “team work” – all at the expense of the individual, as it claims that ‘creativity and intellectual achievement’ only come via teamwork.  Nothing could be further from the truth.  The author covers facts that tackle this rather incisively.

This has taken place because America has wholly shifted en masse unfortunately to teachings that reflect the business community, rather than what’s best for the individual.  What’s worse, Common Core will only further these agendas in order to make sure everyone’s ready to help corporations make even more profits at the expense of true learning.  Let’s digress however.

Another example of how introverts shine is how top performers are often the ones that have the solitude that they require that isn’t available in many working environments.  When freedom of interruption is available, these people overwhelmingly perform better than in environments where excessive stimulation takes place, which hinders production/learning.

Other notions examined are the one of Deliberate Practice, which can only be accomplished by being alone.  This is when not only are tasks identified by individuals that are needed to be done, but when individuals push to raise their performance whilst monitoring their progress and adjusting accordingly in order to be able to achieve what needs to be done.

This not only requires deep motivation, but can lead to incredible mastery of subjects.  It does, however, require a great commitment in many cases if one wants to achieve true expertise.

The book also covers how many extroverts were behind what took place in the 2009 economic downturn, and how introverts wouldn’t have been as careless with money.  It also covers how people tend to link velocity of speech with knowledge, but how that is a big mistake.

Group brainstorming electronically is also delved into, as well as the fear of public humiliation and how large of a role that plays a role in interactions between introverts and extroverts, how important temperament is, as well as the intricate subject of highly reactive children.  Also the topic of pseudo-extroverts is also covered.  This is important, because many people who seem rather extroverted, are in fact incredibly introverted.

If you’re a teacher, a leader, a manager, or any person that needs to know the inner workings of how introverts and extroverts interact on a daily basis, and how to take advantage of each of their strengthen, then this book is definitely for you.

Book Review: The Tipping Point by Malcolm Gladwell

thetippingpoint
BreakawayConsciousness
Zy Marquiez
July 21, 2016

Malcolm Gladwell is an interesting author of a few thought-provoking books.

In Blink, which was his best book by far, Gladwell did an exceptional job of buttressing his thesis with some very convincing evidence.  David & Goliath was a strong book, but not as strong as Blink.  And in Outliers, his work was even a little less convincing in relation to his main proposal.   That’s just my take on it.  Your mileage may vary.

The Tipping Point , is actually my least favorite of them all.  This is because the strong data that made his other books strong was just missing here.

In this particular book Gladwell seeks to argue that at times resounding change in society is driven by three major factors in an epidemic-like fashion: the people involved, the context of the situation and the idea.  This particular foundation was not only sensible, but very practical.

Even though one can see his thesis taking place in many of his examples, the constellation of examples he used could have been much stronger.  Yes, the reader can see how each example in the book could couple with a his main thesis.   The issue is, however, that his thesis would have stood stronger if he provided better examples.

Overall the ‘epidemic’ of change that can take place with the right convergence of elements that the author argues does seem to have a place at least in certain portions of societal change.  That in and of itself is quite fascinating because on paper, many times when people expect wide-ranging change to take place, it doesn’t.  What the author notes serves to at least explain why some changes did work, and some of those changes didn’t.

However, with that said this particular book is not one of those that an individual ‘has’ to have.  If you appreciate his work, and find it quite fascinating, then by all means go ahead.  The book wasn’t a complete let down after all.  It just could have harpooned his main thesis a lot more precisely.

Book Review: Unmasking The Social Engineer – The Human Element Of Security by Christopher Hadnagy

unmaskingthesocialengineer
BreakwayConsciousness
Zy Marquiez
July 11, 2016

“You see, but you do not observe.  The distinction is clear”
– Sherlock Holmes

The Social Engineering topic is a subject that’s as fascinating as its concerning.

Social Engineering is a tool that is used to influence individuals/people to take specific actions.  These actions could be positive or negative depending on the intent of the social engineer.

This topic came of extreme interest to me after reading the book  Tavistock Institute – Social Engineering The Masses by Daniel Estulin.  In that particular book, the author deals with Social Engineering, but at a large scale where it is the goals of institutions to influence cultures/nation states et al, and not in a positive way one might add.

Unmasking The Social Engineer – The Human Element Of Security by Christopher Hadnagy deals with Social Engineering at an individual level, which is greatly appreciated since nigh nobody touches this topic, but its adverse effects are innumerable.

In this particular book the author does an exemplary job of outlining many of the instances and subtle, or no so subtle idiosyncracies that will end up influencing how people feel, one way or another.  If a particular individual is savvy enough, these behaviours will help that individual become a better communicator, and possibly a better person.

On the flip side of that, this particular skillset can also be used for detrimental purposes.  This is why the author notes that its vital for people not only to know how emotions couple with social engineering techniques, but how one can use them for positive and defensive circumstances.

Many people feel a bit recent about there being a book such as this on how to influence people, and rightly so.  The author tackles that concern rather trenchantly:

“We can’t defend properly without knowing how to attack.  If the first time you get punched is your first real fight, it will most likely end badly for you.  That is why people take lessons in how to fight and defend themselves.”[1]

Hadnagy makes it a point of making sure the reader understands that the techniques employed in the book are vital to becoming a better communicator, but more importantly, a better listener, which will inherently increase the quality of life.

Unmasking The Social Engineer is a veritable crashcourse into a kaleidoscope of abilities that are the disposal of people if they realize the effects that can be expected from individuals.  Many of these effects take place through what’s known as amygdala hijacking.

In respect to that, as the author concerningly notes:

“When the emotional processor [the amygdala] kicks into high gear, the logic center processors [neocortex] get almost turned off and blocked.  Adrenaline, hormone levels, and blood pressure rise, and our memories become less efficient.  We begin to lose our ability to communicate effectively, and we turn to a form of autopilot to make decisions.”[2][Bold Emphasis Added]

To add additional grist for the mill, Hadnagy further notes:

“Our brains are hardwired to mirror the emotional content we see from those around us, so it is logical to say that if the social engineer can show mild sadness signs, those signs will trigger empathy in the person they are dealing with.  Once empathy is triggered, and if those social engineer’s words and story create an emotional bond with those words, then the rational and logic centers in the brain shut down momentarilyThis leaves the full processing power of our brain focused on the emotional center, so as a decision is being made based on the request, what is reasonable goes out the window.”[3] [Bold Emphasis Added]

Those facts, along with other salient points, are a large reason of why individuals need to be cognizant when their emotions might be subject to be played like a fiddle.

Another great aspect of this book is that Hadnagy references the work of Dr. Paul Eckman, who has been at the tip of the spear in the area of emotional behaviour and individual idiosyncracies.  Two books that couple well to this book are, Emotions Revealed, and Unmasking The Face.  While these books obviously do not need to be read in order to understand Unmasking The Social Engineer, but they offer extreme depth in this abstruse subject for those interested in delving deeper into this intriguing pool of psychological/physiological data.

The book showcases various components of an individual’s behavior repertoire, and synthesizes it all in an easy to understand matter that’s very pragmatic.

Taking into account the totality and depth of this book, this should not only be compulsory reading for those interested in the intricacies of social engineering, but should be something that everyone should make a point to learn given the vital aspects it plays within safety and communications.

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Sources:

[1] by Christopher Hadnagy, Unmasking The Social Engineer – The Human Element Of Security by Christopher Hadnagy, pg. 204.
[2] Ibid., pg. 166.
[3] Ibid., pg. 173.

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Other Suggested Reading:

Thinking, Fast & Slow by Daniel Kahneman
Mass Control – Engineering Human Consciousness by Jim Keith
Emotions Revealed by Dr. Paul Ekman
Unmasking The Face by Dr. Paul Ekman and Friesen
Snap – Making The Most Of First Impressions, Body Language & Charisma by Patti Wood

Book Review: Snap – Making The Most Of First Impressions, Body Language & Charisma by Patti Wood

snap
BreakawayConsciousness
Zy Marquiez
July 1, 2016

Snap – Making The Most Of First Impressions, Body Language & Charisma by Patti Wood is a top-down analysis of the subject of body language.

The author conveys countless useful tools individuals can use to ascertain how people are feeling.

One of these aspects Wood focuses on rather trenchantly is nonverbal cues that individuals displace which showcase what type of emotions they are feeling.

Other notable points that the author delves into range from the importance of posture, handshakes, the depths of eyes, the positioning of feet, to hand positions, smiles, and much, much more.  The author does a stellar job of showing why attention to these key areas of the human body is vital.

Example after example, the author gives various anecdotes, some personal, many not, of instances where the reader is able to glean the data she provides playing out in a ‘classic’ way.  These are very helpful, and for me helped bring forth past memories of scenarios of myself of others going through rather similar situations.

All in all, the book is straight forward to understand, and its concepts are easy to learn/apply.

This well-rounded analysis into human bodily behaviour should be highly regarded and sought after by all individuals.  After all, a well rounded approach to interpreting body cues is useful for most if not all people.  It would be a straightforward way to increasing an your repertoire.

Book Review: Outliers – The Story Of Success – By Malcolm Gladwell

outliers
BreakawayConsciousness
Zy Marquiez
June 23, 2016

Outliers – The Story Of Success By Malcolm Gladwell delves into the intricacies of what makes an individual successful.

Gladwell postulates many of the finer points responsible for bringing us some of the greatest individuals of our times.

Throughout the book the author cites examples of several individuals – similar to his other books – where he uses data accumulated to showcase the leading drivers for what make individuals so successful –  primarily an individual’s environment/culture.

For context purposes, regarding Gladwell’s other books,  if Blink is an 8.5/10 and David & Goliath is a 7.5 out of then this book is 7.  This book is still good and worth the read if you’re interested in the subject.  It’s just that for me personally, wished it was backed by more data.

Most of the examples made sense, although others could be interpreted in a few ways.  Still, what the author delineates shows more than ample evidence for the fact that an individual’s surge through the ranks of success have much to do with the circumstances that that particular individual lives through.

As the author mentions a few times, IQ alone will get you nowhere if you have no creative potential [not his words].

There are countless individuals who are cerebral studs, but for one reason or another, don’t attain the level of success they are able too.  The reasons for this are given a cursory glance by the author, and it’s quite reasonable the way he states his case.

In its whole, the book could have been slightly more robust, but its drawbacks aren’t so much that it prevents one from learning a few things, and that’s always a plus.